Editor-in-Chief & Publisher: MIR JAVED RAHMAN


MOVIE REVIEW
A Perfect Day


Issue Date 08 - 14 Apr, 2017 at 2:00 PM

A Perfect Day

The movie has been set in an armed conflict zone where a body has been dumped into a well for the purpose of contaminating and cutting off the supply of water for its local population, and circumstances soon turn the easy job of recovering the body into an unattainable mission. The viewer is at the tail end of the Bosnian conflict wherein one finds a small group of relief workers trying to pull out a corpse from a well, put in there, most probably, by other locals, successfully striking one more blow in a battle that will ultimately affect the efforts of NGOs and UN troops.
While the rescue efforts to pull up the body are undergoing, the rope suddenly breaks and the body falls back into the well and the rescue workers Mambru (Benicio del Toro), Sophie (Melanie Thierry) and B (Tim Robbins), along with a young Frenchwoman in Bosnia for the first time, depart with their translator Damir (Fedja Stukan), to get more rope and try retrieving the body again. The expedition takes a day and a night, and as it continues, one has an inclusive portrait of life amidst a battlefield.
Fernando Leon de Aranoa, a Spanish writer-director, is experienced in working with rescue workers while making documentaries, and this very experience shows in this movie’s direction. He has skilfully assigned actors the roles they were adept at performing. The movie might not appeal to those who watch more of commercial cinema, but for those who admire parallel cinema, this is one to watch.

VERDICT
The movie starts with a eroding piece of rope and stretches to grip a battle.


The Ride

MUSIC REVIEW
The Ride
by Nelly Furtado

The Ride is Nelly’s first album after leaving Interscope. Apart from that, it is her sixth album and feels a lot like the debut of a rising superstar. The album opens with a splash of cold water on the face, ironically with track titled Cold Hard Truth that announces a new musical approach, courtesy of St. Vincent producer John Congleton, whose sophisticated beats, harsh guitar tones, and offbeat low-end give a refreshing contrast to Nelly’s trademark adenoidal voice and loud pop hooks.
Her vibrancy elevates the album from a repetitive affair it could have become, ultimately. Nelly’s elasticity is an asset, as she experiments with different styles. Right Road has a bassy swagger; Sticks and Stones carries a synth-rock in its scheme. Pipe Dreams is more like Dev Hynes’ gossamer R&B; while Phoenix and Carnival Games sound like piano ballads.
Peaks of this album, just like Furtado’s best work, capture the same essence of her perspective towards life where she states, “life when it is at its most beautiful is at its most painful.”


Happy Endings

BOOK REVIEW
Happy Endings
by Margaret Atwood

Happy Endings is one among the author’s most often-anthologised tales because it is just so atypical. As far as its type is concerned, it is not so much of a story as much as it is an instruction manual on how to write one. But with respect to its content, it is indeed a dominant life observation. The tale is, in fact, made of six stories combined in one. Atwood paints six different probable scenarios labelled A-F, as it depicts marriage, life, as well as the death of a couple. Story A recounts story of Mary and John’s happy life; story B is deplorable; story C is rather untidy; story D is tragic; while story E is meant to be painful, the novelist leaves story F for her readers to perceive it in whatever way they want. In every tale, Atwood has written, the details and elaborations conclude that death is inevitable. The book can be understood in two different ways. It can be that Atwood wants her readers to examine their lives, wherein the beginning and endings don’t matter, instead, it is what comes in between that makes them who they are.

 


Pakistan: A Personal Historyy

First Person
Pakistan: A Personal History

I mran Khan’s autobiography talks about his journey from a lover boy cricketer to a spiritually-guided believer and from a philanthropist to a politician. His story is fused with features from the country’s history. Sometimes, he seems to merge his own fate with that of the country, and at other instances pens down a charismatically sincere account of his personal life. Khan portrays how his immature nature ultimately succumbed to faith. His cricketing career taught him that dedication and talent do not entirely make one successful, in fact, towards the end, he states that it all comes down to luck. The book, however, does not give any evidence about his effectiveness in politics as much as his insight into cricket and philanthropy. It gives the reader an impression of his plans to construct a party that can engage the nation. A good engaging read for not just his fans but foes, alike.


 

 



Ride 2

GAME REVIEW
Ride 2

The game seeks to combine the excitement of riding a bike and that sense of exhilarating exposure that you get when racing across a runway without the suffocation of sitting in an enclosed car, with the depth and form of the likes of Forza Motorsport or Gran Turismo.
It is a commendable goal; an effort to provide bike lovers a similar kind of extensive excursion that car nuts have been given for many years. However, the game stumbles at the first gear and an awkward first spin off the line infects the rest of the journey.
It has an uninteresting appearance that results in a low-key delight at each turn. It does not really make a convincing case for the usual motorbike games. However, it is a genre that does not receive much representation when compared to games based on cars.

 

 

 


PICKS OF THE WEEK

Give and Take
by Adam Grant

Unfortunately, contemporary culture teaches one to be backstabbing and brutal on the road to professional growth. However, this book states the otherwise, highlighting the research which finds out that those who value others end up being successful in their fields.

Tiny Beautiful Things
by Cheryl Strayed

There are days you need good advice and this book gives you that. Strayed, the author of the book, writes essayistic responses to the readers of a literary magazine Sugar, while this book is a collection of all those responses.

Meditations
by Marcus Aurelius

As you grow up, you understand that there might not be a time where everything you want would happen. This book helps you cope with that. It is a collection of personal writings on maintaining tough mental strength through examples given from the life of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.



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