Editor-in-Chief & Publisher: MIR JAVED RAHMAN


MOVIE REVIEW
Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk


Issue Date 22 - 28 Apr, 2017 at 2:00 PM

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

This movie is a follow up to director Ang Lee’s Oscar winning Life Of Pi. The two-time Academy Award winner brings his exceptional vision to the movie, which is based on the best-selling, widely-acclaimed novel Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk written by Ben Fountain.
The movie is told from Billy Lynn’s perspective who is a 19-year-old soldier. He is part of the Bravo Squad along with his fellow soldiers and becomes a hero after a harrowing battle in Iraq. He is temporarily brought home for a victory tour. The film portrays what happens to the team, while contrasting the truth which is part of the war through America’s viewpoint.
The film stars Vin Diesel, Chris Tucker, Kristen Stewart, Steve Martin, and Garrett Hedlund. Director Lee makes use of new technology and shoots at an ultra-high frame rate for the first ever time in the history of films, while creating a deeply engaging digital experience that help him dramatise war in a way no one has ever witnessed before. This movie is written by Simon Beaufoy, the Oscar winning screenwriter of Slumdog Millionare and directed by Lee is an American war drama film combined with battle flashbacks, since it picks up on the soldiers as they get ready to become popular.

VERDICT
The film never really appears to find its ground, regardless of its promises of a sharper, smarter and much grave plot.


Memories...Do Not Open

MUSIC REVIEW
Memories...Do Not Open
by The Chainsmokers

This talented young duo is an ultimate favourite among music lovers these days and it is not difficult to see why. Astonishingly enough, their album begins rather promisingly with the generically-titled, piano-led The One that plods along very satisfyingly with its hard-hitting kick and chorus as well as the tasteful singing chops. However, despite being an apparent highlight, this is the shortest tune on their album. What follows this track is the catchy, pop-rock Break Up Every Night that sounds like an average Martin Solveig B-side, even though not in a bad manner. From thereon, the album is pretty miserable. It hardly reaches the lowest part of the barrel territory and saves for single Something Just Like This, which features Chris Martin and close Last Day Alive featuring Florida Georgia Line, but it does not have much worth waiting for. Nevertheless, the album does comprise of some good vocals by Jhene Aiko and Emily Warren. There is nothing much exciting about most among the album’s twelve songs, as there are no unpredictable anthemic colours, no dramatic vocals, nothing. The album is too loud for your morning commute and too safe for the club.


Lila'

BOOK REVIEW
Lila'
by Marilynne Robinson

Set in Gilead, a town in Iowa, this tale explores the territory from a relatively new angle. Give this book a try, as you’ll be won over, perhaps by its very first sentence: “The child was just there on the stoop in the dark, hugging herself against the cold, all cried out and nearly sleeping.” The child being discussed here is Lila, whose view of the world becomes the reader’s while reading the book. The story is narrated in present times, when Lila is grown up; however, the narrative usually shifts to her earlier days. A woman named Doll is her protector of sorts and takes her away from a brutal, freckles household for a life to be spent on the road. Everything about the plot seems clichéd. The protagonist as a woman is uneducated, strange and uncannily discerning. She is a character that seems so real that it is difficult to remember that she lives only between the pages of the book. Her years of wandering and her memories before she arrives in Gilead are neither romanticised nor are they treated with moralising terror. Lila is one of those books that provide one a sense of wholeness and are known for being precious for this very reason.


Long Walk to Freedom

First Person
Long Walk to Freedom

Nelson Mandela’s autobiography describes his struggle against the apartheid in South Africa along with all those who had participated with him. Mandela talks about his childhood days, his growth as a freedom fighter, 27 years of imprisonment as well as his extraordinary role in the making of a democratic South Africa. The autobiography was initially published in the year 1995, when South Africa’s first democratic elections brought Mandela to the forefront of governance as the first black president. He starts his book with a description of his ancestry to silence rumours about his hereditary claim to the monarchy of the Xhosa people – one of the largest cultural groups in South Africa. In the other two sections of the book, Mandela illustrates his younger years of adulthood as well as his gradual shift into a freedom movement leader of his country.

 

 



Flatout 4: Total Insanity

GAME REVIEW
Flatout 4: Total Insanity

It is fair to expect some madness while playing this game, ironically tilted ‘Total Insanity’. The game is certainly chaotic and it pretty much makes sense that it will stick to the tried and tested formula of treading on chaotic racetracks. The races and spectacle that ensue are unpredictable and wild in ways they need to be, but beyond its updated visuals, the game’s entire package comes with a lot of annoyances. Its presentation seems uninspired, has poor music, terrible engine sounds, bland menus and mixes with cruel AI and a wrecked sense of progress to make it appear more flat than fantastic. Flatout 4 does not bring anything exceptional to the series and while the game and its party modes are fine for some enjoyment, its single-player progression is a lot to bear.

 

 

 

 


PICKS OF THE WEEK

Not That Kind of Girl
by Lena Dunham

We like Dunham as the wise and comical creator and star of Girls. Now she has launched herself in the literary sphere with a sassy, smart memoir. This book is a must for those who are familiar with Dunham’s usual wit.

The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher
by Hilary Mantel

The book is a collection of modern stories that exhibit the qualities of the author’s writing that have shaped her career. They navigate through several topics such as class, family fracture and marriage, but all have been cut to the core of human experience.

The Innovators
by Walter Isaacson

The book discovers “How a group of hackers, geniuses, and geeks created the digital revolution”. It is a history of digital innovation and revolution and the way some entrepreneurs worked towards innovation and its impact on our society.





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