Editor-in-Chief & Publisher: MIR JAVED RAHMAN


Major Leaguer
Robin Li


Issue Date 26 Aug - 01 Sept, 2017 at 2:00 PM

Robin Li

Robin Li is the Co-Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Internet search leader Baidu. After receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in information management from Peking University in 1991, and a Master of Science degree in computer science from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1994, he worked as a Senior Consultant at a subsidiary of Dow Jones and designed the real-time financial information system for the online edition of the Wall Street Journal. In 1999, Robin received a US patent for a system of hyperlink analysis, one of the inventions that has helped shape search technology. He then joined InfoSeek as a Senior Engineer.
Robin cofounded Baidu in January 2000 and has led the company to make it China’s largest search engine, with over 70% market share. Baidu is not only the largest Chinese search engine globally but also the second largest independent search engine in the world. In 2005, Baidu became a NASDAQ-listed public company and the first Chinese company to be included in the NASDAQ-100 Index in 2007. The same year, The Financial Times listed Baidu as one of the Top 10 Chinese Global Brands, with Baidu being the youngest company as well as the only Internet company in the list.
Being the pioneers and leading figures in China’s Internet industry, Robin’s achievements are widely recognised. In 2013, Robin became a member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference and currently acts as Vice Chairman of the All-China Federation of Industry and Commerce and Vice Chairman of the Internet Society of China (ISC). Moreover, Robin is a ‘1000 Talent’ National Distinguished Expert and has received honours including ‘CCTV Key Figure in China’s Economy,’ ‘The Top 30 Figures in China’s 30 Years of Reform,’ ‘Ten IT Leaders,’ along with others. Robin also topped Forbes’ list of ‘2012 China’s Best CEOs’ and was listed in the list of World’s Most Powerful People three years in a row.


Capilano Suspension Bridge

Ancient Routes
Capilano Suspension Bridge

Capilano Suspension Bridge stretches 450 feet across and 230 feet above Capilano River in British Columbia, Canada. The long bridge takes visitors to the rainforest and the seven suspension bridges of Treetops Adventure, a unique, tree-friendly encounter high in the forest.
Originally built in 1889, the bridge wasn't an icon of progress built with the most modern of techniques. It's actually amongst the oldest forms of bridges in the world and has become one of the most visited attractions in Canada. Although structurally sound and completely safe, the bridge wobbles from side to side when walked on, giving visitors a thrilling experience. The view of the surrounding valley from the Capilano Suspension Bridge is breathtaking.
On the west side of the bridge is a series of trails. One of these trail series, the Cliffwalk, is the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park’s newest attraction. Open since July 2011, this trail is really a narrow path cantilevered and suspended on a cliff face high above the Capilano River. Another trail series on the other side of the bridge is the popular Treetops Adventure. Treetops Adventure is a series of seven suspension bridges connected to Douglas firs. The bridges take hikers from tree to tree, and offer a spectacular view of the surrounding rainforest.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

WEEK IN HISTORY

26 August, 1883: One of the most catastrophic volcanic eruptions in recorded history occurred on the Indonesian island of Krakatoa. Explosions were heard 2,000 miles away. Tidal waves 120 ft. high killed 36,000 persons on nearby islands, while five cubic miles of earth were blasted into the air up to a height of 50 miles.

WEEK IN HISTORY


27 August, 2008:
Barack Obama became the first African-American to be nominated by a major political party for President of the United States.

28 August, 1963: The Evergreen Point Bridge, the longest floating bridge in the world, opened between Seattle and Medina, Washington, US.

29 August, 2005: Hurricane Katrina made its second landfall as a category 3 hurricane devastating much of the U.S. Gulf Coast from Louisiana to Florida Panhandle. It killed more than 1,836 people and caused over $115 billion in damage.

30 August, 1981: President Mohammad Ali Rajai and Prime Minister Mohammad Javad Bahonar of Iran were assassinated in a bombing committed by the People's Mujahedin of Iran.

31 August, 1997: Diana, Princess of Wales, died in a Paris car crash along with her companion Dodi Fayed and driver Henri Paul while fleeing paparazzi.

01 September, 1897: The Tremont Street Subway in Boston opened, becoming the first underground rapid transit system in North America.


Chrysler Building

Vantage Point
Chrysler Building

A fusion of modern and Gothic aesthetics, the 77-floor Chrysler Building is an Art Deco-style skyscraper located on the East Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Designed by William Van Alen in 1930, the building was constructed as the headquarters for Walter P Chrysler and his automobile empire.  In 1976, the Chrysler Building was declared a National Historic Landmark. The building underwent purchase and renovation in 1998 with completion by mid-2000, bringing the building’s total rentable area to 2,062,772 square feet.
At 1046 ft with its spire, the building held the title of being the world's tallest for 11 months until the Empire State Building was built. The Chrysler Building Lobby is possibly the most ornate and expensive lobby in the entire city. It is elaborately veneered elevators are especially beautiful, their Egyptian lotus motifs made of inlaid Japanese ash, Oriental walnut and Cuban plum-pudding wood. A tribute to the age in which it was created, it is filled with Deco triangles, sharp angles, slightly curved lines, chrome detailing, and a multitude of patterns. The lobby shows scenes primarily of the workers that created the building, as well as tributes to the airplane and the age of flight.
Interior and exterior alike, it is admired for its distinctive ornamentation based on features that were also found on Chrysler automobiles at the time. Its triangular form is lavishly decorated with Red Moroccan marble walls, sienna-colored floor, onyx, blue marble and steel. Artist Edward Trumbull was hired to paint murals on the ceiling; these paintings and other parts of the interior were refurbished in 1978 by JCS Design Associates and Joseph Pell Lombardi.

Gibraltar

FLAG
Gibraltar

Gibraltar was one of the ancient Pillars of Hercules which delimited the known world to Europeans. It was ceded to Britain by Spain after the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 and, while largely self-governing, remains the last British colony on mainland Europe. Consequently, the official flag is the Union Jack, although the white and red flag has been in use unofficially by citizens there since 1966. It is based on the city arms presented to Gibraltar in 1502 by Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain, and features two unequal horizontal bands of white over red. On the white is a three-turretted castle from which hangs a key, symbolizing Gibraltar’s strategic importance as the gateway to the Mediterranean.


Words you didn’t know came from Literature

Word Play
Words you didn’t know came from Literature

1. Jabberwocky
Defined as meaningless speech or writing, Jabberwocky was the title of a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll included in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There.

2. Munchkin
Munchkin is defined as a person who is notably small and often endearing and in most cases refers to a small child. The characters called the Munchkins were introduced in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) by L. Frank Baum. The association of munchkins with small stature was reinforced by the use of little people to portray them in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.

3. Grok
The verb grok means to comprehend or understand something intuitively. It first appeared in Robert Heinlein's 1961 novel Stranger in a Strange Land. The word is borrowed from the Martian language on which Smith was raised. Early expanded use of grok in computer programming culture is credited with endowing the word with the meaning it has today.

4. Pollyanna
Pollyanna is defined as a person characterised by irrepressible optimism and a tendency to find good in everything. The name Pollyanna is also the title character of a 1913 children's novel by Eleanor Hodgman Porter. Although Pollyanna was a well-liked character and Porter's book a best-seller, the association of Pollyanna with optimism took a cynical cultural turn, and eventually the name came to refer to one whose excessive cheerfulness is regarded as naïve or even deluded.

5. Newspeak
Newspeak is defined as propagandistic language marked by euphemism, circumlocution, and the inversion of customary meanings. In George Orwell's anti-utopian novel 1984, newspeak refers to the language carefully employed by minions of the authoritarian character known as Big Brother. Designed, in Orwell's words, "to diminish the range of thought," newspeak is characterized by the elimination or alteration of certain words, the substitution of one word for another, and the interruption of logic that can cause a word to be interpreted to mean its opposite, usually for the sake of political or corporate messaging.

6. Madeleine
Madeleine is defined as a small rich shell-shaped cake and one that evokes a memory, but it was the appearance of the cake in a novel that gave us the second sense of the word. In the first volume of Marcel Proust's seven-part novel Remembrance of Things Past, the narrator experiences a rush of nostalgia after tasting a madeleine dipped in tea, a snack he remembers being given by his aunt when he was a child.

7. Utopia
Coined by Sir Thomas More, this word was first used as the name for More’s fictional island in his 1516 book, Utopia. In this book, which More wrote in Latin, he outlines the ideal society, though his suggestions are to be taken with a pinch of salt. The word “utopia” has since become used to describe any ideal world. The word is from the Greek u-topos meaning ‘no place.’

8. Nerd
The word comes from a 1950 book by Dr Seuss, If I Ran the Zoo. In the poem, a nerd is one of the imaginary animals the narrator claims he will collect for his zoo. As a rough translation for ‘geek,’ the word entered popular use by the end of the 1950s.

9. Pamphlet
The word comes from a comic love poem dating from the 14th century and written in Latin. The poem, Pamphilus; or, Concerning Love, somehow became associated with unbound booklets. The name Pamphilus is actually from the Greek meaning “friend of everyone” or “lover of all.”

10. Mentor
This one is from ancient Greece, and the work of Homer, specifically, The Odyssey. Odysseus took 10 years to get home from the Trojan Wars, because of many mishaps and digressions. In Odysseus’ absence, the character of Mentor advised Telemachus, Odysseus’ son – hence the modern connotation of the word of ‘mentor’ as ‘adviser.’





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